General Enquiries

+44 (0) 191 217 0775

Media Enquiries Gravity London

+44 (0) 20 7330 8810

Fax Us

+44 (0) 191 236 2709

Write to us

Credit Services Association

2 Esh Plaza

Sir Bobby Robson Way

Great Park

Newcastle Upon Tyne

NE13 9BA

Additional Sections

Complaints Procedure

Useful Links

Making a complaint

We work hard to ensure our Members act within the rules set by the industry regulators.

Please click on the following link and read our Code of Practice. If you think a Member has broken the rules of this Code you can make a complaint by downloading our Complaints Form.

Before making a complaint we would encourage you to carry out the following activities:

 

  • Go to the Members Directory and check whether the company you wish to complain about is a Member of the CSA. If you are still unsure, feel free to contact us. If the company is a Member of the CSA then we are able to help you with your complaint.
  • On first instance, we recommend you contact the Member company to discuss any issues you have and enquire about their complaints process. If you are still dissatisfied with the outcome then you can review our Complaints Procedure.
  • If you believe that the Member has acted in breach of our Code of Practice and the complaint meets the necessary criteria, please complete, sign and return the Complaint Form to our registered address.

CSA Complaints Procedure

 How we deal with your complaint.

All complaints must be submitted in writing, with a signed complaint form. We require the form to be signed so that we, and our member, have the requisite authorisation to share information.

The following is the sequence of events after the CSA receive a complaint form;

  • CSA receive a signed complaint form
  • CSA register the complaint and send a copy to the relevant member company
  • The member is given eight weeks to respond directly to the complainant
  • CSA get a copy of the response from the member company
  • CSA considers both positions and determines whether the Code of Practice has been breached
  • Appropriate action is taken (if required) to remedy the situation
  • If further information is required the CSA contact the relevant party (the complainant or the member company).
  • After a full review, the CSA provides a formal response to the complainant

 

If you remain unhappy with the outcome of the complaint, you may have justification to escalate the matter to our our head of compliance, Claire Aynsley, claire.aynsley@csa-uk.com.

 

Please note: The CSA can only intervene when;

  • a member company is in breach of the Code.
  • the company is a member of the CSA (we cannot act when the complaint is about the client of a member company, a bank or building society for example).
  • the information supplied by a member company appears from the facts to be incorrect.

Methods of Contact

 

Address

Credit Services Association

Complaints Department

2 Esh Plaza

Sir Bobby Robson Way

Newcastle-upon-Tyne

NE13 9BA

 

Why the CSA need a signed copy of your complaint

 

Top

17-05-2018

Debt collection industry acts decisively to ease burden of customers with mental health issues

The debt collection industry has taken a significant step towards stopping people in debt with mental health problems from having to pay to prove their condition at the very time they are least able to afford to do so.

Coinciding with Mental Health Awareness Week, the Credit Services Association (CSA), the voice of the UK debt collection and debt purchase sectors, has proactively revised its Code of Practice to make it easier for customers to evidence mental health problems that affect their ability to manage their money without having to revert to the Debt and Mental Health Evidence Form (DMHEF) for which GP’s often levy a substantial charge.

John Ricketts, President of the CSA, says that the Association has started from the principle that individuals should not have to pay for medical evidence, where such evidence may be used to help improve their financial, physical and mental well-being: “Those who are most vulnerable should not have to take on more debt to prove it,” he says.

The revised Code advises members not to ask customers to approach health professionals for evidence in the first instance, but rather to engage with the customer to better understand their position,consider what evidence of their health problem is appropriate, and to seek other forms of supporting evidence (e.g a prescription or appointment letter) if necessary.

Only as a last resort, or if the evidence is directly required by the original creditor, should the Debt and Mental Health Evidence Form be requested – and even then, the cost should not be borne by the individual in debt.

The change follows a series of meetings last year, championed by the Prime Minister, Theresa May, the Minister for Mental Health, Jackie Doyle-Price, and the Money & Mental Health Policy Unit, in which various organisations (including the CSA), charities and clinicians (including the BMA), discussed how the (DMHEF) is used and paid for.

Mr Ricketts says it is unacceptable that someone with money and mental health problems should have to pay to evidence their condition: “We’ve therefore taken the proactive step of issuing clear guidance to our members on how they can support the most vulnerable and shifting the focus away from the use of the Debt and Mental Health Evidence Form,” he explains.

“Being in debt can be a stressful experience and we recognise that. We want to encourage other interested groups to follow this lead and work with them to ensure that all creditors, not just CSA members, see this as a positive move and likewise not request evidence that could ultimately add to a customer’s debt burden.”

Jackie Doyle-Price MP, Minister for Mental Health, added: “This is a significant step towards addressing the injustices that people who have mental health problems often face. Around half of those with a debt problem also have mental ill health and many of those with a mental health condition cite concerns about money as a contributing factor.

“Everyone with a mental health condition deserves to be treated compassionately and I encourage other groups to follow the CSA’s lead to ensure their customers’ mental health is both respected and protected.”

 

Notes to editors:

  1. The Debt and Mental Health Evidence Form was devised by the Money Advice Liaison Group, a not for profit organisation bringing together the credit, debt collection and debt advice sector to promote best practice, understanding and professionalism. 
  2.  Organisations involved in the discussions included UK Finance, the Money Advice Trust, StepChange and Citizens Advice.